Category Archives: Medicine/Health/Healing

CAULDRON COOKING

On Sunday I cooked lunch for the family as I usually do.

I made a chicken fajitas rice meal with peppers, oranges, corn, shredded cheese, and honey,  snap pea stir fry vegetables and water chestnuts cooked in olive oil, fresh strawberries, and sour cream. As was typical I used plenty of herbs and spices. Since we were out of white wine I drank green tea with ginseng and honey and had a cup of coffee (not shown).

Not the best lunch I’ve ever made but certainly quite good.

Strangely enough I have learned something new about cooking from playing Skyrim. I now cook the main course on Sunday in a mini-cauldron (I’m going to be getting an even larger cauldron for this very purpose) and thereafter we can eat leftovers for the next two to three days.

 

WOMAN, EAT MY SOUP!

My wife woke up sick with a cold.

So I let her sleep late, did my morning work, did my morning PT and hike, came back and ate my lunch, made her some soup, woke her up and had her eat it.

Then to entertain her as she ate I did an impromptu dance and made up a rap song, ad hoc, just for her. Ladies and gentlemen I give you my latest foray into the rap genre market:

EAT MY SOUP

Eat my soup and you’ll get real bettah
Eat my soup and you’ll get real wettah,
Wettah
Bettah
Wettah
WETTAH!
CAUSE YA GOTTA GET WETTAH IF YOU WANNA GET BETTAH!!!

 

(You see proper hydration is extremely important in recuperating from illnesses and injuries.)

Anyway, she laughed…

YOUR PRIMAL BODY

A few weeks back I bought a book by a woman named Mikki Reilly entitled Your Primal Body.

I got the book for only a dollar at the Dollah Tree! No, seriously, it was only a dollar. Because everything at the Dollah Tree is a dollar.

Although I have used training methods such as Fartlek and HIIT in my PT programs for some time now (these are promoted in the book) this was my first real introduction to the Paleo Diet and the so-called paleo-lifestyle.

I have been reading the book slowly, making notes in it, underlining and hi-lighting various ideas and concepts, but over the past two to three weeks I have also been applying the various principles espoused therein. The gains I have been making in my muscularity, in being pain-free in my joints, in my overall flexibility, in my energy levels, in general health, in memory, focus, and concentration, in the sheer physicality of my sex life (just ask my wife), and in weight loss have been tremendous in such a short period of time.  I feel a great deal like I am in my 30s, but constantly and consistently.

Although the book was written by a chick primarily for chicks the principles are general and easily applicable to anyone at any age. I recommend the book.

 

Also in researching the book for this post I discovered she has a youtube interview:

AMAZING…

It is amazing what the human body can do and endure when it is properly fed, rested, and watered…

 

MEATS, VEGETABLES, ETC…

Meats, vegetables, fruits, fats, dairy, oils (mainly olive oil), and honey. These are the only things I eat anymore and I feel infinitely better for it.

Also I drink a lot of water.

THE CODE WITHIN – BODY OF EVDIENCE

I’ve long suspected something like this… and I don’t see at all how it could be a surprise, after all it is readily available raw material, just not always actualized or properly arranged material.

It is a lot easier than seeking out and incorporating alien or foreign genetic material.

 

A Surprise Source of Life’s Code

Emerging data suggests the seemingly impossible — that mysterious new genes arise from “junk” DNA.

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Genes, like people, have families — lineages that stretch back through time, all the way to a founding member. That ancestor multiplied and spread, morphing a bit with each new iteration.

For most of the last 40 years, scientists thought that this was the primary way new genes were born — they simply arose from copies of existing genes. The old version went on doing its job, and the new copy became free to evolve novel functions.

Certain genes, however, seem to defy that origin story. They have no known relatives, and they bear no resemblance to any other gene. They’re the molecular equivalent of a mysterious beast discovered in the depths of a remote rainforest, a biological enigma seemingly unrelated to anything else on earth.

The mystery of where these orphan genes came from has puzzled scientists for decades. But in the past few years, a once-heretical explanation has quickly gained momentum — that many of these orphans arose out of so-called junk DNA, or non-coding DNA, the mysterious stretches of DNA between genes. “Genetic function somehow springs into existence,” said David Begun, a biologist at the University of California, Davis.

New genes appear to burst into existence at various points along the evolutionary history of the mouse lineage (red line). The surge around 800 million years ago corresponds to the time when earth emerged from its “snowball” phase, when the planet was almost completely frozen. The very recent peak represents newly born genes, many of which will subsequently be lost. If all genes arose via duplication, they all would have been generated soon after the origins of life, roughly 3.8 billion years ago (green line).

This metamorphosis was once considered to be impossible, but a growing number of examples in organisms ranging from yeast and flies to mice and humans has convinced most of the field that these de novo genes exist. Some scientists say they may even be common. Just last month, research presented at the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution in Vienna identified 600 potentially new human genes. “The existence of de novo genes was supposed to be a rare thing,” said Mar Albà, an evolutionary biologist at the Hospital del Mar Research Institute in Barcelona, who presented the research. “But people have started seeing it more and more.”

Researchers are beginning to understand that de novo genes seem to make up a significant part of the genome, yet scientists have little idea of how many there are or what they do. What’s more, mutations in these genes can trigger catastrophic failures. “It seems like these novel genes are often the most important ones,” said Erich Bornberg-Bauer, a bioinformatician at the University of Münster in Germany.

The Orphan Chase

The standard gene duplication model explains many of the thousands of known gene families, but it has limitations. It implies that most gene innovation would have occurred very early in life’s history. According to this model, the earliest biological molecules 3.5 billion years ago would have created a set of genetic building blocks. Each new iteration of life would then be limited to tweaking those building blocks.

Yet if life’s toolkit is so limited, how could evolution generate the vast menagerie we see on Earth today? “If new parts only come from old parts, we would not be able to explain fundamental changes in development,” Bornberg-Bauer said.

The first evidence that a strict duplication model might not suffice came in the 1990s, when DNA sequencing technologies took hold. Researchers analyzing the yeast genome found that a third of the organism’s genes had no similarity to known genes in other organisms. At the time, many scientists assumed that these orphans belonged to families that just hadn’t been discovered yet. But that assumption hasn’t proven true. Over the last decade, scientists sequenced DNA from thousands of diverse organisms, yet many orphan genes still defy classification. Their origins remain a mystery.

In 2006, Begun found some of the first evidence that genes could indeed pop into existence from noncoding DNA. He compared gene sequences from the standard laboratory fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, with other closely related fruit fly species. The different flies share the vast majority of their genomes. But Begun and collaborators found several genes that were present in only one or two species and not others, suggesting that these genes weren’t the progeny of existing ancestors. Begun proposed instead that random sequences of junk DNA in the fruit fly genome could mutate into functioning genes.

Diethard Tautz, a biologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, once doubted whether de novo genes could exist. He now thinks they may actually be quite common.